The evolution of advanced manufacturing in New Hampshire

Advanced manufacturing is the evolution of traditional manufacturing trades. By using new technologies and methods, professionals – and apprentices – in this field improve processes and use sophisticated equipment that requires some advanced training. Depending on your career path, you could learn blueprint reading, machine tool math, hydraulics, and other high-tech skills.

Earn while you learn, and help advance NH

In New Hampshire, advanced manufacturing is a crucial industry to our state’s economy. It drives the creation of products and services ranging from mechanical parts to microscopic electronics components. Join the team at a company producing complex and advanced tools and equipment for use across the globe or upgrade your skills to over to the next level.

Where can an advanced manufacturing apprenticeship take you?

The skills you learn during as an advanced manufacturing apprentice can translate into professions in hundreds of companies across the state. Those companies share their specific needs with ApprenticeshipNH, so we can find the perfect program match among the 50+ available career tracks taught at our Community College System of NH campuses. After completing a registered apprenticeship, you will have the skills and confidence to progress in your existing career, or even begin a new one.

Possible professions in advanced manufacturing:

  • Aerospace engineering and operations technicians
  • CNC machine tool programmers and operators
  • Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers
  • Electromechanical equipment assemblers
  • Extruding and drawing machine setters, operators, and tenders
  • First-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, and repairers
  • Industrial engineering technicians
  • Industrial engineers
  • Industrial machinery mechanics
  • Industrial production managers
  • Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers, and weighers
  • Machinists
  • Maintenance workers, machinery
  • Materials engineers
  • Mechanical drafters
  • Mechanical engineering technicians
  • Millwrights
  • Patternmakers, metal and plastic
  • Team assemblers
  • Tool and die makers
  • Welders, cutters, and welder fitters
  • Welding, soldering, and brazing machine setters, operators, and tenders

What type of companies hire advanced manufacturing professionals?

You might be surprised to find out you are qualified for a position in these areas:

  • Aeronautical/aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Chemical and petrochemical
  • Computers
  • Construction
  • Consumer products
  • Defense
  • Electric utilities
  • Electronics
  • Environmental
  • Food and beverage
  • Glass, ceramics, and metals
  • Machine tools
  • Mining and metallurgy
  • Nuclear
  • Professional and scientific equipment
  • Textiles
  • Transportation
  • Water and wastewater